Illustory of the Silent Victims | Proposal

August 29, 2011 § Leave a comment

Today I submitted my Proposal Document…

UTS will forward this to outside industry professionals and have a look, along with my mentor to give me constructive criticism and feedback. Hopefully I reached some form of clarity in communicating what I want my project to about, what I want to reveal and what I want people to take away. I have edited and re-wrote this several times trying to justify my work and open myself to new things that I have not considered before.

Illustory_ProposalDocument

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Communicating the Project | 03

August 22, 2011 § Leave a comment

And we’re getting closer to a final proposal for my project…

 

Illustory of the Silent Victims elicits a poetic interpretation of a historical narrative through the ‘authorship’ of illustration. It is poetic in the context of embracing a sensitive and emotional style of expression. Illustory of the Silent Victims is a visual translation derived from Mayumi Itoh’s Japanese Wartime Zoo Policy: The Silent Victims of World War II. The scope of this project is framed by the narratives of Ueno Zoo, encompassing the war afflictions against those zoo animals by human folly. Through this project I’m re-creating an experience for the audience of how I visualize this trajectory of history through the illustrations I share, whilst inducing sentiments of empathy and compassion for the destroyed zoo animals. Thus, an audience with an appreciation for Modern History, an appreciation for Illustration, a concern for animals and animal welfare; would appreciate Illustory of the Silent Victims. Entailing such areas of interest is best housed in independent bookstores, where people look for something a little bit different and creative. Accordingly, Illustory of the Silent Victims would flourish in that creative and cultured environment. I am applying an aesthetic to this narrative history where the illustrations inform you of a subjective perception of a historical context. Experiencing a historical interpretation does not have to conform to pure accounts of cause and effects. The elements of cause and effect can be the premise of a narrative, where in this case; the cause is the Japanese Home Ministry enforcing the Wartime Zoo Policy for motivations of propaganda, which consequently resulted in about two hundred zoo animals destroyed. Illustory of the Silent Victims is a design of Historiography. Foremost, it manifests as a book featuring the illustrated narratives of Ueno Zoo’s destroyed animals. As an accompaniment, the project includes a poster series and a website proposal to deliver an interactive experience. Illustory of the Silent Victims offers a writing of history that is authored through illustration. It is historiography creatively conceived and executed creatively.­

Communicating the Project | 02

August 18, 2011 § Leave a comment

I’ve made another draft for my project proposal.

It’s not finished but gives an idea of what the project is about. I need to put in a bit more thought about the audience and what I mean by a “design of historiography”.

Illustory of the Silent Victims elicits a poetic interpretation of a historical narrative through the ‘authorship’ of illustration. Poetic in context embracing a sensitive and emotional style of expression. For the scope of this project, it is framed by the narratives of Ueno Zoo and the war afflictions against those zoo animals by human folly. This is a visual interpretation derived from Mayumi Itoh’s Japanese Wartime Zoo Policy: The Silent Victims of World War II. Through this project I’m re-creating an experience for the audience of how I visualize this trajectory of history through the illustrations I present whilst inducing sentiments of empathy and compassion for the destroyed zoo animals. Experiencing a historical interpretation does not have to conform to pure accounts of cause and effects. The elements of cause and effect can be the premise of a narrative; where the cause is the Japanese Home Ministry enforcing the Wartime Zoo Policy for motivations for propaganda, which consequently resulted in about two hundred zoo animals destroyed. I am applying an aesthetic this narrative history where the illustrations inform you of a subjective perception of a historical context. Illustory of the Silent Victims is a design of Historiography.

Filtering the Methodology of Illustory

August 11, 2011 § Leave a comment

I try out my first attempt of communicating my project on my supervisor Jacqueline Gothe. It’s intense to find how different it is verbalising your concept as opposed to mind-mapping it. The first question put forward was how exactly does illustration enable an audience to stand proxy to a historical experience? What does it mean for the audience to stand proxy to a historical experience? What is the role of a historian? What is my role?

This directive of the project is on a different trajectory to a project that is essentially telling history through Illustory. Another question posed was whether my focus is on the process of applying an aesthetic to historiography? Or is it a visual translation specifically of Mayumi Itoh’s book?

Suggesting that the audience is proxy to a historical experience, I am also trying to enable them to make an interpretation based on the illustrations. What is the motive of this process of enabling? I suggested that it allows them to account for the significance of the history visualised. Yet where I fell short in my methodology is understanding the visualisation of history through illustration is purely a projection of my interpretation of a historical narrative; and it is rather me facilitating that perspective to an audience as opposed to enabling them a perspective.

I imagined the illustrations to be ambiguous (meaning abstract and expressive) and have an aesthetic of openness to allow that audience interpretation. But then that is not the directive of history nor the ethos of a historian. So realistically there should be clarity and structure. But there is still room for expression, but maybe not communicated as ‘ambiguous’. I’ll know how to frame the illustrations when I start the creative process. So if these illustrations were to enable that proxy role; the project would require the audience to gather evidence, interpret, discern a perspective, formulate a narrative structure and essentially story-tell; as a historian would do. Yet for me, for this time-frame at least, I would prefer the illustrations to be my visual translation of a historical narrative. I’m facilitating an aesthetic to an audience.

There are still more questions to address. And even more questions to raise. But this is opening up a discourse to discern what exactly I want out of this project and what I expect this project to do.

Communicating the Project | 01

August 9, 2011 § Leave a comment

This would be my first attempt to reach clarity in proposing my project in a public space that addresses the following questions –

What is your project about?

Who is the audience?

Where is your project likely to appear?

What form/s will it take?

[Project] elicits a poetic interpretation of a historical narrative through the ‘authorship’ of illustration. Specifically, the scope of this project is an evocation of the afflictions against zoo animals by human folly in Japan, during World War II. [Project] would foremost be housed within a ‘book experience’ accompanied by collateral media such as posters and interactive elements.  [Project] assumes a narrative role that re-creates an experience for the audience through a subjective visualisation of history also inviting the audience to make their own interpretations. Ones that hold a vested interest in the interpretations of history would appreciate this historical narrative. Experiencing a historical interpretation does not have to conform to dense accounts of cause and effects. It feeds into a filter of desensitization. Yet the elements of cause and effect can be the premise of a narrative. [Project] encourages those who have either a mere or deep interest in history to appreciate its importance and evoke a poetic filter of compassion. One who ventures to museums, galleries, libraries or even the zoo for this particular case would find this project sitting comfortably in context. As a design practitioner, I am applying an aesthetic to a narrative of history. Each illustration enlightens a myriad of nuances of its historical context. The illustrations informs your subjective perception of a historical context. By engaging with [Project] you are proxy to a historical experience. [Project] is a design of historiography.

Ethos of Illustory

August 8, 2011 § Leave a comment

Contextually, I see my project as a poetic interpretation of a historical narrative through the ‘authorship’ of illustration. I cannot take credit as a historian nor even an academic. But I do exert my ethos of interest and motivation of evoking history through means of narrative illustration. When I mean ‘narrative illustration‘, I mean to re-create an experience for the audience of how I visualise history and allow the audience to also make their own interpretations though the information I provide in amalgamation with the illustrations I present.

Even though I claim no credit as a historian or an academic, I do consider it important to have a general understanding of historiography, in terms of the writing of history, to inform my own process of interpreting history. During my senior years of high-school, I thoroughly enjoyed studying Modern History, especially about World War II in the Pacific and investigating the history and culture of Japan. I see this project as a reflective project of that interest and an opportunity to refine that pre-existing knowledge of Modern History.

Hence, in this archive blog, will you find summaries of literature I have briefly read and applied to my understanding of historiography and history as narrative. This process is to add depth and substance to my illustrations and enlighten my practice that is appropriate to the context of the project.

The image included is of my notebook where I write my notes, thoughts and ideas.

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